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  • Blog Title: Federal Practice

    Starbucks and its Changing Policies Regarding Mandatory Training and Bathroom Usage

    On May 29, 2018, Starbucks closed 8,000 company-owned stores within the United States for one afternoon to provide mandated racial bias training to its 175,000 employees. The decision to provide racial bias training came forth after a manager of Starbucks called the police when seeing two black enter their Starbucks located in downtown Philadelphia without […]

    What is the PAID Program? How Can it Affect Employers? Resolution or Trap?

    On March 6, 2018, the U.S Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division announced a nationwide pilot program, the Payroll Audit Independent Determination (PAID) program. PAID allows employers to self-assess potential wage and hour underpayments under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) while helping to protect themselves against litigation threats from the Department of labor […]

    When Must an Employer Compensate its Employees for Time Spent Donning and Doffing?

    Donning and doffing refers to changing into and out of work clothes, gear, or equipment. To don means to put on work clothes, gear, or equipment. To doff means to take off work clothes, gear, or equipment. While both federal and state laws require that employers compensate employees for all “work” performed, both federal and state […]

    Amendments to Federal Rules of Evidence Effect ESI Authentication

    On December 1, new amendments to Federal Rules of Evidence 803(16) and 902 went into effect that are designed to change the way that electronically stored information (“ESI”) is authenticated in federal court. These amendments were made in response to growing concerns over a potential evidentiary loophole for ESI that has been stored for a […]

    The Second Circuit Reviews New York Methodist Hospital Worker’s FMLA Suit

    On June 30 2017, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit found that the District Court erred when it held that an employee had not proven a “serious health condition” to qualify for medical leave. The Second Circuit reasoned that the District Court used an interpretation of the regulation that was too narrow. […]

    A Single Racist Comment May Establish a Title VII Violation

    In April 2017, the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, held that a single racist comment can, when severe enough, establish a discriminatory hostile work environment. Otis Daniel, a 35-year-old African American male, began working for T&M Protection Resources, Inc. in 2010. Daniel worked as a fire safety director for T&M for […]

    Third Circuit Court Denies Penn State Football Coaches’ Claim

    The United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit (the “Third Circuit”) recently affirmed the U.S. District Court’s decision to grant Penn State University’s motion to dismiss claims made by two former Penn State football coaches. Coaches Jay Paterno and William Kenney sued Penn State in 2014, claiming they were denied due process of […]

    University of Chicago Prevails in Discrimination and Retaliation Lawsuit

    A federal jury in Illinois recently returned a verdict in favor of the University of Chicago Medical Center (“UCMC”) in a discrimination and retaliation lawsuit. A former UCMC resident, Dr. Maria Artunduaga (“Artunduaga”), sued the University of Chicago in 2012, claiming she experienced discrimination (hostile work environment) while employed by the UCMC. Artunduaga began her […]

    Transgender Students Find Success in Pennsylvania Federal Court

    Three transgender high school students in Pittsburgh recently prevailed in federal court in temporarily halting a school district policy requiring the students to use restrooms that do not conform with their gender identities. The Pennsylvania court’s decision comes just a week after the Trump administration announced that it would rescind guidance issued by the Obama […]

    UPS Facing Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) Class Action Lawsuit

    United Parcel Service, Inc. (“UPS”), the world’s largest package delivery company, was recently hit with a proposed class action lawsuit in a federal court in Florida. The lawsuit alleges that the company violated the Fair Credit Reporting Act (“FCRA”) by “using background checks to make employment decisions without providing workers or applicants with the results.” […]